Tag Archives: book review

Zom-B by Darren Shan | Book Review [Spoiler free]

This is actually my second time reading this book. In fact, I was reading the series as it came out but over time I, unfortunately, lost track of the releases and never got the chance to finish the series. I did, however, manage to get through 9 of the 12 books but instead of picking up where I left off (considering there was a pretty big gap in time), I decided to just start from the beginning and write a little review for each book a long the way. So for this review, there will be no spoilers whatsoever considering it’s for the first book.

For those of you who don’t know, Zom-B follows B, a teenager living in London where zombies attack. Even before the undead rise, B lives a life filled with racism and abuse that are just as important in their story as the zombies. Throughout, we see how all of those things can connect and we get to know B as our main character.

Continue reading Zom-B by Darren Shan | Book Review [Spoiler free]

The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick | Book Review

There are MINOR spoilers.

More than a couple of years ago now, I was on holiday in a little seaside town in England when I wandered into a shop that sold novelty items and clothing. On one of the shelves sat The Invention of Hugo Cabret and it was being sold for only £4. I knew a little about it and that most people generally liked it so I bought it. I didn’t, however, read it until today which is something that I deeply regret because this book is fantastic.

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Landline by Rainbow Rowell | Book Review

This post contains spoilers.

I’ve wanted to read Landline ever since it came out. Unfortunately, it’s taken me until now to actually pick it up but fortunately, I quite enjoyed it. The concept has always stood out to me and while I’ve read her three young adult books: Fangirl, Eleanor and Park, and Carry on. I hadn’t read this or her other adult book Attachments. I was intrigued by the plot of this book but also the fact that it was aimed at adults. I really like Rowell’s writing and I was curious to see what I would think when it came to a different target audience.

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